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Information about employment

Supported employment
The Individual Placement and Support model of supported employment (IPS) for individuals with serious mental illness has been designated an evidence based practice by the Center for Mental Health Services and the State of Oregon.

Job corps
Job Corps is a free education and training program that helps young people learn a career, earn a high school diploma or GED, and find and keep a good job. For eligible young people at least 16 years of age that qualify as low income, Job Corps provides the all-around skills needed to succeed in a career and in life.

Employment department
A place to begin searching for jobs in Oregon.

Career development topics
Explore these topics for a more detailed look at the career development process and steps that are important for your child as he or she pursues work life. You will find practical ideas about ways you can continue to support your child’s future. And you will be able to get suggestions for activities and other resources to help you and your child.

Interactive tool for job seekers
My Next Move is an interactive tool for job seekers and students to learn more about their career options, including growing jobs.

US Military
What is the military? In simple terms, the U.S. Armed Forces are made up of the five armed service branches: Air Force, Army, Coast Guard, Marine Corps, and Navy. There are three general categories of military people: active duty (full-time soldiers and sailors), reserve & guard forces (usually work a civilian job, but can be called to full-time military duty), and veterans and retirees (past members of the military).

Oregon Vocational Rehabilitation Services
Information for OVRS clients and advocates, can also search for a local office and a contact.

Work source
This website includes links to workforce, economic development and training information - culled from a vast array of agencies and entities - all conveniently located and easy to navigate. You will also find information on the Governor's Workforce Initiatives.

Job Accommodation Network (JAN)
Answers to questions about workplace accommodations or the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and related legislation.

Services & programs for people in Oregon with developmental disabilities
Employment Support is a service that assists an individual to get, learn and keep a paid job/career in an integrated work setting where most of your co-workers are persons without disabilities. Paid work may be full time or part time. Each worker with a disability may have his or her own individual job or work within a small group called a crew or enclave.

United cerebral palsy (UCP) of Oregon and southwest Washington
The employment department at UCP is called Employment Solutions. We assist qualified job seekers who experience a disability to connect with employers who value what they bring to the workplace

 

 

Community, Oregon or National resources

Supplemental Security Income (SSI)
The Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program pays benefits to disabled adults and children who have limited income and resources.

OVRS (directory of vocational Rehabilitations services local offices)
Service directory for local OCRS Oregon offices

DD (Community Developmental Disabilities Programs)
Directory of community developmental disabilities programs in Oregon

Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) or Food Stamps
The intent of the Program is to help improve the health and well being of low-income households and individuals by providing them a means to meet their nutritional needs. Contrary to popular belief, SNAP benefits are not meant to meet all of the food needs of a household or an individual, but to supplement their nutritional needs. People do not need to be destitute to qualify for SNAP benefits.

Swindell's Resource Center
Swindell's Resource Center of Providence Child Center supports parents and caregivers of children who have special needs, developmental delays or disabilities. We provide resources, information and education to communities throughout Oregon and southwest Washington.

Oregon ARC
The Arc Oregon has been advocating for Oregonians with intellectual and developmental disabilities since 1954. We strive to create an inclusive, independent, high-quality lifestyle for individuals and families.

Partnerships in Community Living (PCL)
The Residential Team brings the PCL mission to life through the implementation of Individual Support Plans (ISP) and Person-Centered Plans for each person supported by PCL. Each team focuses on supporting each person in their home to become as self-reliant and interdependent as possible. We balance individual goals and dreams with the need to monitor and maintain each person's health and safety.

 Oregon Health Plan or Medicaid
The Oregon Health Plan (OHP) provides health care coverage to low-income Oregonians through programs administered by the Division of Medical Assistance Programs (DMAP). Currently, more than 600,000 people each month receive health care coverage through the Oregon Health Plan.

Family to Family Health Information
The Oregon Family to Family Health Information Center provides information to families who are navigating the complex world of special health care needs. We are family members ourselves, who have first hand experience raising a child or youth with a chronic health condition, developmental delay or disability, or emotional/behavioral challenges.

Let's connect
a training series for parents and professionals offered by the United Cerebral Palsy of Oregon and SW Washington

National Center on Secondary Education and Transition
The National Center on Secondary Education and Transition (NCSET) coordinates national resources, offers technical assistance, and disseminates information related to secondary education and transition for youth with disabilities in order to create opportunities for youth to achieve successful futures.

National Council on Independent Living
NCIL advances independent living and the rights of people with disabilities. NCIL envisions a world in which people with disabilities are valued equally and participate fully.

Child Welfare Information Gateway
Adolescents face a range of developmental issues, and as teens approach adulthood, living independently becomes a significant goal. While youth with intact families may struggle to achieve self-reliance, youth in out-of-home care face formidable obstacles. The following resources provide information on helping adolescents transition to adulthood and live independently.

Interim Healthcare
Interim HealthCare®, founded in 1966, is the nation's leading home care, hospice and medical staffing company. Interim’s more than 300 independently owned and operated franchise locations provide a variety of home health, senior care, hospice, palliative care, pediatric care and healthcare staffing services

Assistive Technology & Curriculum Solutions
AbleNet is an international company and industry leader in providing educational and technical solutions to help children and adults with disabilities lead productive and fulfilled lives. This includes a complete line of communication aids for nonverbal individuals; access aids for all ages and situations; and special education classroom curriculum that both enhance and help ensure learning progress.

Morrison - Child & Family Services
Morrison Child and Family Services is a non-profit organization that delivers specialized services to children, from birth through age 18, and families coping with adversity and trauma. We respect the complexity of human nature and human needs–we guide children and their families through difficult issues by tailoring treatment plans to address individuals' needs and help them live productive lives.

Child Development & Rehabilitation Center
The Child Development and Rehabilitation Center (CDRC) combines clinical excellence with innovative research to provide the best care for children with special health needs.  Our clinics use a family-centered, team approach to care for each of our patients and families.

Mental Health Programs in Oregon
OHA and its partners are improving mental health services to children by involving parents and youth in decisions, delivering more children's mental health services in the community, improving inter-agency cooperation and acknowledging the child's language and cultural heritage.

Oregon Department of Education: information on Special Education
The Special Education Data, Fiscal, Legal, & Information Units of the Office of Student Learning and Partnerships are responsible for providing general supervision statewide of the Individuals with Disabilities Act of 2004 (IDEA 2004). IDEA 2004 federal mandates include provision of a free and appropriate public education (FAPE) in the least restrictive environment (LRE), appropriate evaluation, Individualized Education Program (IEP) accountability, parent and student participation in decision-making, procedural safeguards, monitoring, technical assistance and enforcement.

Source for assistive technology information
AbleData provides objective information about assistive technology products and rehabilitation equipment, and a directory of products

Oregon Housing and community services
affordable housing resources

Parents Helping Parents
PACER Center is a parent training and information center for families of children and youth with all disabilities from birth through 21 years old. Located in Minneapolis, it serves families across the nation, as well as those in Minnesota. Parents can find publications, workshops, and other resources to help make decisions about education, vocational training, employment, and other services for their children with disabilities. PACER’s National Bullying Prevention Center provides resources designed to benefit all students, including those with disabilities.

Information about IEP

IEP
As parents, teachers, and students, you talk about Individualized Education Programs, or IEPs, all the time. Why, then, do they still cause so much confusion, or overwhelm—as our community indicated in a recent survey. IEP Headquarters intends to change that

Understanding the transition IEP process
Once your child is 16 years old, a transition IEP must be held by the IEP team to discuss future services. This is done through an Individual Transition Plan or ITP.

Keeping Special Education Records
Resolving Special Education Issues: Keeping special Education records

Oregon Standard IEP
The Oregon Standard IEP, which includes a Part A: Guidelines for Completion, and a Part B: Oregon Standard IEP form has been revised to comply with IDEA 2004 and the federal regulations. Revisions also include additional enhancements to the both the IEP guidelines and form. ODE now provides a standard IEP for students age 15 or younger when the IEP is in effect; and a standard IEP for students age 16 and older when the IEP is in effect (for students of transition age).

Post-Secondary Education Information

College Resources for Disabled Students
Prospective college students with disabilities will find that many campuses are equipped with offices and services that address accessibility, accommodation, and assistive technology for a diverse range of needs. Student services offices and disability coordinators at many colleges work to make campuses inclusive environments through specialized advocacy, support, and academic services.

Financial Aid guide for Students with Disabilities
A financial aid and scholarship guide for students with disabilities, one of the few comprehensive and simple-to-use directories of its kind. It lists numerous scholarship options for students with disabilities that range from national financial aid opportunities to local opportunities within the United States and Canada. Each scholarship profile indicates whether online programs at accredited colleges or universities are eligible for the award.

Financial Aid, Scholarships and loans
Read about the types of financial aid available from the government and other sources: grants, scholarships, loans, and work-study.

Financial Aid Opportunities for Disable Students
There are many financing options and benefits available to disabled students. This is our guide to the opportunities out there.

Information for those planning to go to college
Welcome to Planning for College where you will learn the ins and outs of what you need to do to plan for college!

Students with disabilities preparing for college
Students with disabilities preparing for post secondary education: know your rights and responsibilities

College Options for people with intellectual disabilities
Think College is a national organization dedicated to developing, expanding, and improving inclusive higher education options for people with intellectual disability. With a commitment to equity and excellence, Think College supports evidence-based and student centered research and practice by generating and sharing knowledge, guiding institutional change, informing public policy, and engaging with students, professionals and families

Association on Higher Education and Disability (AHEAD)
AHEAD is the premiere professional association committed to full participation of persons with disabilities in post secondary education.

Oregon Community Colleges
Directory of Oregon community colleges information

Life on a College Campus
Once the college planning process is over and you have been accepted to a school, you will need to know what to expect with life on campus. Will you make new friends? Will finals stress you out? From dorm room decorating to campus safety, this section will help you understand what campus life is really like.

for Parents: when my child goes to college
Planning for college can be just as intimidating for parents of college-bound students as it can be for the students themselves. eCampusTours has created this section specifically with you in mind. We've included several topics geared specifically toward parents aiding their children in the college planning process.

The first year at college, the transition year
The Transition Year is an online resource center to help parents and students focus on emotional health before, during and after the college transition.

Planning for college
With a variety of colleges available, you need to understand your options and choose the right college for you. A little college planning can put you on the road to success. You might need information about choosing a college or what questions to ask on your campus tour. You will also need to know how to prepare for college admission, understand application deadlines, find out about paying for college and financial aid, or maybe consider the available extracurricular activities at your schools of choice.

 Oregon vocational and technical schools
A list of vocational schools in Oregon, by city, by subject , and by school

Tips on selecting a private career school
Helpful tips on how to select a private career school

Job Corps
Job Corps is a free education and training program that helps young people learn a career, earn a high school diploma or GED, and find and keep a good job. For eligible young people at least 16 years of age that qualify as low income, Job Corps provides the all-around skills needed to succeed in a career and in life.

GED
GED Oregon has GED exam resources and links

 

 

Help your student transition to adult life

Youth Hood
Here you can start thinking about what you want to do with the rest of your life.  This website was built to help you plan for the future.

Career development topics
Explore these topics for a more detailed look at the career development process and steps that are important for your child as he or she pursues work life. You will find practical ideas about ways you can continue to support your child’s future. And you will be able to get suggestions for activities and other resources to help you and your child.

National Center on Secondary Education and Transition
The National Center on Secondary Education and Transition (NCSET) coordinates national resources, offers technical assistance, and disseminates information related to secondary education and transition for youth with disabilities in order to create opportunities for youth to achieve successful futures.

Transition to Adulthood
Life is full of transitions, and one of the more remarkable ones occurs when we get ready to leave high school and go out in the world as young adults. When the student has a disability, it’s especially helpful to plan ahead for that transition. In fact, IDEA requires it.

School to adult life transition
A multi-disciplinary team approach is used when planning for a student's transition, which can begin as early as age 12. The plans should become part of the student's Individual Education Plan (IEP) and include  adult outcomes

Transition Year
The Jed Foundation knows about the complex transition from high school to college. Our experience shows parents can benefit from having the right information and resources to help them anticipate, plan for, and protect the emotional health of their college-age children.

Fully Inclusive Theater Company Production for Youth
Emerging Leaders Players (ELP) is the first fully inclusive West Coast-based theater group for youth and adolescents (ages 13-30) with and without disabilities that live in and nearby Portland, Oregon. ELP is a part of a larger group of transition services offered through the University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities (UCEDD) located within the Institute on Development & Disability (IDD) at Oregon Health and Science University. 

Transition to Adult Life for Students in Special Education
This has a list of articles that cover many topics about student in special education

Transition to Adulthood and Independent Living
Adolescents face a range of developmental issues, and as teens approach adulthood, living independently becomes a significant goal. While youth with intact families may struggle to achieve self-reliance, youth in out-of-home care face formidable obstacles. The following resources provide information on helping adolescents transition to adulthood and live independently.

Oregon Housing and Community Services
Affordable housing resources

Rental and Housing Search
Connecting people with affordable housing in the Portland/Vancouver metro area

US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD)
Affordable housing resources

Fair Housing Council of Oregon
The Fair Housing Council of Oregon (FHCO) is a nonprofit civil rights organization driven to eliminate illegal housing discrimination through enforcement and education across Oregon.  We promote equal access to housing by providing education, outreach, technical assistance, and enforcement opportunities specifically related to federal, state, and local fair housing laws. These laws protect against illegal housing discrimination based on “protected class status” in any housing transaction and, in fact, any housing situation.

Family and Community Together (FACT)
Empowering Oregon families experiencing disability

Transition Resources - Oregon Department of Education
Various links to resources related to transition

National Center for Learning Disabilities
In partnership with the 92nd Street Y in New York City, NCLD created a menu of easy-to-use materials that are intended to help teenagers and their families get a head start on the post-high school transition process

While your student is still in High School

Checklist for parents of high school students
High school goes by quickly for most students – and their parents. And after high school, what then? Regardless of whether your teen plans to go to college, work, apprentice, join the military, travel, or some combination, high school is an important time to prepare. Your student needs your help because his or her responsibilities are mounting. Here are some things you will want to stay on top of. The first is a list of general items for all four years, followed by specific lists for each year.

Transition Planning for Students with IEPs
The transition from high school to young adulthood is a critical stage for all teenagers; for students with  disabilities , this stage requires extra planning and goal setting. Factors to consider include post-secondary education, the development of career and vocational skills, as well as the ability to live independently. The first step in planning for a successful transition is developing the student's transition plan. A transition plan is required for students enrolled in special education who have an Individualized Education Program (IEP). In this article, we will define and describe transition planning and how it can be utilized to maximize your teenager's future success.

Oregon High School Exit options
a list of high school diplomas and alternatives

Oregon Diploma credit requirements
These refer to state-wide requirements and serve as a minimum for graduation. Local districts may have additional graduation requirements. For the most complete list of requirements for graduation, please contact your local high school.

Advanced Placement (AP) classes and tests
The College Board's Advanced Placement courses are college-level classes in a wide variety of subjects that you can take while still in high school. They offer you challenging course work and a taste of what college classes are like.

Understanding the Transition IEP Process
Once your child is 16 years old, a transition IEP must be held by the IEP team to discuss future services. This is done through an Individual Transition Plan or ITP.

Planning to live independently
This resource page is designed to help you and yours take apart the concept of independent living, examine its many elements, and put the concept back together again with concrete plans and insight into what it takes to turn the concept into reality.

Teen's Health
Answers questions that teens have about health issues, body changes, mental health and other questions

Fully Inclusive Theater Company Production for Youth
Emerging Leaders Players (ELP) is the first fully inclusive West Coast-based theater group for youth and adolescents (ages 13-30) with and without disabilities that live in and nearby Portland, Oregon. ELP is a part of a larger group of transition services offered through the University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities (UCEDD) located within the Institute on Development & Disability (IDD) at Oregon Health and Science University. 

Getting a driver's license
This page provides information on obtaining an Oregon Driver License (provisional) if you are under the age of 18. Other requirements apply if you are 18 years of age or older.

ODE: information on Special education
The Special Education Data, Fiscal, Legal, & Information Units of the Office of Student Learning and Partnerships are responsible for providing general supervision statewide of the Individuals with Disabilities Act of 2004 (IDEA 2004). IDEA 2004 federal mandates include provision of a free and appropriate public education (FAPE) in the least restrictive environment (LRE), appropriate evaluation, Individualized Education Program (IEP) accountability, parent and student participation in decision-making, procedural safeguards, monitoring, technical assistance and enforcement.